Dynamic imagery of Houston: R&B singer Solange releases her new album “When I Get Home” Dynamic imagery of Houston: R&B singer Solange releases her new album “When I Get Home”
BY EMMA HUERTA On March 1, R&B singer Solange Knowles released her fourth studio album entitled “When I Get Home,” complete with 19 tracks... Dynamic imagery of Houston: R&B singer Solange releases her new album “When I Get Home”

BY EMMA HUERTA

On March 1, R&B singer Solange Knowles released her fourth studio album entitled “When I Get Home,” complete with 19 tracks over a span of 39 minutes. This comes three years after the artist released the critically acclaimed album “A Seat at the Table,” which won her the Best R&B Performance Grammy in 2016 for the song “Cranes in the Sky.”

Although Solange wrote, performed and executively produced the entire album “When I Get Home,” many songs included work from other famous artists— from talented producers, like Metro Boomin, Steve Lacy and Pharrell Williams, to popular rappers, including Tyler, the Creator, Gucci Mane, Earl Sweatshirt and Playboi Carti.

However, all of these features she highlights are a part of a much bigger theme within the record: black culture excellence.


The record examines the unique characteristics of Solange’s hometown of Houston, Texas, where both she and her sister— and fellow musician— Beyoncé grew up. She talks about important aspects of the culture of their hometown, such as candy paint and the major bypass S Macgregor.

These references all contribute to the vast feeling that Solange wanted to evoke emotion from her audience after hearing the record, which she accomplished successfully. The album is a great representation of her past memories, and thus allows her audience to experience such nostalgia in their imaginations through the music.

However, all of these features she highlights are a part of a much bigger theme within the record: black culture excellence. This is mostly emphasized in the Williams-produced song “Almeda” (named after an area in Southwest Houston of the same name), where Solange sings along with The-Dream and Playboi Carti about things dear to her and her community.

With so many star-studded contributors on the record, as well as such a profound message, Solange’s “When I Get Home” was bound for greatness.

She sings, “Black faith still can’t be washed away / Not even in that Florida water,” which is a reference to a unisex cologne often used in Voodoo rituals thought to have spiritual effects. She basically says that not even an enchanted, Voodoo cologne could diminish the hope of the black community.

Other notable songs on the record include “Down With the Clique,” which includes Tyler, the Creator on additional vocals and keys, “Dreams,” which was produced by and features Earl Sweatshirt and “My Skin My Logo,” produced by Steve Lacy and featuring Gucci Mane. Williams also produced the song “Sound of Rain,” which has his staple emblem: the four-beat intro including guitar riffs and additional vocals from Steve Lacy.

With so many star-studded contributors on the record, as well as such a profound message, Solange’s “When I Get Home” was bound for greatness.

The album not only has a great overall sound, but also often includes a lot of variation in style and genre, largely due in part to all its contributors. Although the lyrics at times don’t seem to be the most descriptive or clever and are often repetitive, Solange still packed a lot of power— and meaning— in her 19 innovative, groovy beats.

Popular R&B singer Solange released her new album “When I Get Home,” which is a tribute to her Houston roots and the culture that helped shape not only her music, but her own self as well.
  • Amazing production.
  • Good collaboration with other artists.
  • Lyrics aren’t very impactful.
  • Songs often sound a bit repetitive.

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Photo courtesy of Jackie Lee Young