Clubs attract new members during annual Rush Week Clubs attract new members during annual Rush Week
BY KYLE NELSON With students dancing, music thumping and colorful banners covering walls and table, the cafeteria and courtyard of Cooper City High School... Clubs attract new members during annual Rush Week

BY KYLE NELSON

With students dancing, music thumping and colorful banners covering walls and table, the cafeteria and courtyard of Cooper City High School spent the week of August 28 looking like a movie set. Rather than filming yet another sequel for High School Musical, however, the students were simply gathering to display their clubs’ individuality and recruit some new members.

Rush Week is an annual event set up by the Student Government Association (SGA) with the purpose of getting students involved in extracurriculars including athletics and clubs. Senior Molly Baumel and sophomore Kimberly Slinkosky were in charge of the operation.

With close to 40 clubs on display, students had a smorgasbord of diverse extracurriculars to choose from.

“I often recommend students join Best Buddies because it gives students a chance to make new friends and to help others,” guidance counselor Theresa Sullivan said. “I suggest Key Club to students if they want to get service hours on campus, but I do tell them that many clubs do projects that can earn them service hours.”

Whether it’s the booming music from SGA, passionate chants from Thespians or eye-catching technology from Robotics Club, each CCHS extracurricular had their own way to attract a crowd.

With over 200 students signed up to join, SGA had one of the largest turnouts in years. SGA president Emily Miranda accredited this turnout to their lively and animated approach to turning the heads of new students.

“It has been amazing to see so many students of all grade levels showing an interest in our club and trying to get as involved as possible,” Miranda said. “We can’t wait to meet all of our new members and hear all of the ideas they have for this upcoming school year.”

While well known clubs like Best Buddies, SGA, Key Club and NHS are great options for students, many smaller clubs with unique purposes are offered as well. Clubs like Robotics Club, Multicultural Club and Environmental Club are all great options for students to get involved while participating in something they enjoy.

Of the many ways for students to voice their opinions, Multicultural Club serves as an outlet for all people to express their viewpoints on topics in every sector of the political scale. Co-presidents Sarah Molina and Ayana Fitzgerald prides themselves on producing a safe and accepting environment for all people at CCHS. Going by the slogan “United In Diversity,” the two recruited members this year with different social media platforms to spread their message.

“Multicultural Club is very open minded with ideas and the students who join; no one should be afraid to say what they want to say,” Molina said. “In Multicultural Club, we are united in diversity.”

Robotics Club is a modified version of Technology Club committed to expanding students’ minds to understand the capabilities of technology. In the club, students learn basic HTML and Java coding, basic electrical engineering and have discussions on the latest technological advancements all over the world. Once the foundations are set, students will assemble a robot with their own hands and customize it to their liking.

“Robotics Club is fairly new to the school, but that doesn’t mean it’s any less exciting,” co-president Madison Worley said. “This year we’re competing with the robots we will build throughout the meetings. I’m really excited [about it].”

So, whether students joined a club with 200 members or 20, Rush Week gave students the ability to explore all the resources offered.

Featured photo by Casey Chapter